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Maps of Huaqing Hot Spring

Huaqing Hot Spring

Located at the northern foot of Mt. Lishan in Lindong County of Shaanxi Province, 30 kilometers eastern from Xian, Huaqing Hot Springs is a state place of interest as well as scenic spot.

According to the record, as early as the Dynasties of Zhou, Qin, Han, Sui and Tang, temporary imperial abode was constructed here. In the 6th year of Emperor Xuanzong Reign in the Tang Dynasty(747) it was expanded on a massive scale by turning the hot springs into bathing pools, ringing the Mount with palace buildings, which were to be protected by an outer circular defensive wall and renamed it Huaqing Palace. As the palace was built upon the hot springs, it was also called Hot Spring Pools. The Huaqing Hot Springs was destroyed, during the An Lushan Rebellion in 756 in the Tang Dynasty. The present-day site is only a small part of the Tang Huaqing Palace. The Huaqing Hot Springs which we see today was rebuilt on the site of the Qing Dynasty structure. The palace covers an area of 85,560 square meters.

Entering the West Gate of Huaqing Hot Springs, you will see the Nine-Dragon Pool, the Lotus Flower Pool and the Frost Drifting Hall, etc. All these structures were rebuilt in 1959 according to Tang architectural style.

Today this is a favorite site for Chinese tourists. In fact, it is famous for not only a great scenic spot to see, but also the history behind the area is very vivid and colorful!

The most romantic story that accompanies the history of the springs is that of the Chinese equivalent of Romeo and Juliet: the story of the Emperor Xuan Zong and his concubine Yang Guifei. Yang was a poor girl who the Emperor took a fancy to and promoted to the position of "lady". The Empire was being threatened as the Emperor was distracted from his daily work due to Yang and the courtiers threatened to kill the concubine, blaming her for the Emperor's mismanagement of his nation. Desperate and madly in love, Yang hung herself to save the country and her lover's name. The springs were renamed the Huaqing or "The Fair" springs, in honor of Yang Guifei's beauty.