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beijing tour

Reed Flute Cave Guilin

Reed Flute Cave is located northwestern outskirts of downtown (about 4.5 miles). It was created by an ancient underground river, which slowly eroded the interior of the limestone mountain. It is named after the reeds that once grew at its entrance, from which local people made kind of flutes. The cave is full of stalactites and stalagmites in various shapes and sizes, and equipped with a multicolored lighting system, which resemble a Chinese-version story of Journey to the Center of the Earth. The cave was popular with tourists and poets about 1300 years ago during the Tang Dynasty. Some wrote inscriptions on the cave walls, which can be seen today.

A visitor will walk for some 550 yards through a zigzagging sea of stalactites and stalagmites in dazzling colors. Although the cave is also known as a Palace of Natural Art, man-made strategies use artificial lighting to emphasize the coincidental similarity of the rock formations to birds, plants, and animals. One grotto is called The Crystal Palace of the Dragon King--an area that resembles a miniature Guilin, where can comfortably hold about 1000 people.

The most eye-catching feature of cave is a great slab of white rock hanging from a ledge like a cataract, while opposite stands a huge stalactite which resembles an old scholar. The story goes that a scholar who came here to have an eye feast wished to write a poem to describe the cave¡¯s beauty. After a long time he only get two sentences and, lamenting his inability to find the right words, turned to stone.

Reed Flute Cave Photos